Staff photo/Hayley Day Islanders scooped marine creatures like jellyfish from the pier.

University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories open house | Photos

Staff at the University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories opened their doors to the community on Saturday, May 20. The annual open house included self-guided tours, microscope research, SCUBA diving demos, a 58’ research vessel, marimba bands, and lectures. Check out photos, below, for a glimpse of the day.

Read more about the open house in this article, featured in the May 17 edition of the Journal.

 

Staff photo/Hayley Day Islanders scooped marine creatures like jellyfish from the pier.

Staff photo/Hayley Day Islanders scooped marine creatures like jellyfish from the pier.

Staff photo/Hayley Day Volunteers explain the creatures they found in the water.

Staff photo/Hayley Day Volunteers explain the creatures they found in the water.

Staff photo/Hayley Day Islanders could board the labs’ 58’ research vessel.

Staff photo/Hayley Day Islanders viewed kelp, starfish and other marine creatures, up-close.

Staff photo/Hayley Day Islanders viewed kelp, starfish and other marine creatures, up-close.

Staff photo/Hayley Day Four lectures were given at the open house, including one by Dr. Deborah Giles, who teaches at the labs.

Staff photo/Hayley Day According to open house signs, Robert Kauffman, a labs professor, invited an African musician to the University of Washington in 1968. The musician, known as Dumi, inspired hundreds to perform his country’s traditional marimba music in the Pacific Northwest, including the San Juans.

Staff photo/Hayley Day According to open house signs, Robert Kauffman, a labs professor, invited an African musician to the University of Washington in 1968. The musician, known as Dumi, inspired hundreds to perform his country’s traditional marimba music in the Pacific Northwest, including the San Juans.

Staff photo/Hayley Day According to open house signs, Robert Kauffman, a labs professor, invited an African musician to the University of Washington in 1968. The musician, known as Dumi, inspired hundreds to perform his country’s traditional marimba music in the Pacific Northwest, including the San Juans.