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You can help if the 'big one' hits — and when the smaller ones hit year-round

A partially submerged houseboat — its satellite dish clearly visible at left — floats off Eagle Point, on the west side of San Juan Island, Tuesday. The state Department of Natural Resources was expected to visit the site Tuesday and determine if the vessel should be removed.  - Molly Neely-Walker
A partially submerged houseboat — its satellite dish clearly visible at left — floats off Eagle Point, on the west side of San Juan Island, Tuesday. The state Department of Natural Resources was expected to visit the site Tuesday and determine if the vessel should be removed.
— image credit: Molly Neely-Walker

Want to help if the "big one" — oil spill, that is, hits, or with all the smaller ones that do happen year-round?

Islands' Oil Spill Association has scheduled classes, drills and trainings for volunteers. All training is free. Call 378-5322 or e-mail iosaoffice@rockisland.com to register for training. Visit www.iosaonline.org.

Saturday, Sept. 26: HAZWOPER Safety Training, Deer Harbor, Orcas Island (required class for spill containment and oiled wildlife responders).

Saturday, Oct. 3: Boom deployment/containment drill, Fossil Bay, Sucia Island.

Saturday, Oct. 17: Spill assessment, drills de-briefing, lessons learned from spills and drills, HAZWOPER, Lopez Center for Community and the Arts.

Sunday, Nov. 1: Care and rescue of oiled birds training, including search and rescue, handling, transport, initial stabilization and essential primary care needs at Lopez Center for Community and the Arts (required for oiled wildlife responders).

Saturday, Nov. 14: Boom deployment/containment drill at Mosquito Pass, northwest side of San Juan Island.

Saturday, Nov. 21: HAZWOPER safety training at town Fire Hall, Friday Harbor (required class for both spill containment and oiled wildlife responders).

Federal and state regulations require that anyone responding to an oil spill is first required to take a basic four-hour HAZWOPER class (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response) before being allowed on-scene at a spill.

"Once you've taken the class, it's a good idea to take a refresher class every few years," IOSA's Jackie Wolf said in an e-mail. "These classes are more interesting than they sound."

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife requires that anyone who wants to help with search and rescue operations and/or other jobs involving wildlife during a spill have a minimum of 4 hours HAZWOPER training and have taken the Basic Care and Rescue of Oiled Wildlife class.

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