Lifestyle

Convergence zone: climate change, current events, and Cliff Mass

Renowned meteorologist, radio commentator and U of W professor Cliff Mass will talk about current events, like climate change and coal trains, as well as the weather, in a free presentation, Tuesday, July 22, at the Mullis Center  - Contributed photo
Renowned meteorologist, radio commentator and U of W professor Cliff Mass will talk about current events, like climate change and coal trains, as well as the weather, in a free presentation, Tuesday, July 22, at the Mullis Center
— image credit: Contributed photo

You've heard him on the radio, and now you find out all about the weather, and current events, from meteorologist extraordinaire Cliff Mass, in person, Tuesday, July 22, at the Mullis Center.

Mass has at least three "hot topics" to chat about as part of a free presentation at the Friday Harbor senior center, sponsored by San Juan Island, beginning at 6 p.m. The regionally renowned University of Washington atmospheric sciences professor will explore the relationship between global warming, the media and coal trains, the influence each and on the other, and offer a perspective, based on facts, of how that inter-relationship might best be viewed.

“Global warming is a serious problem that requires immediate attention, but there are two serious problems," Mass says. "One, the media and politicians are not giving an accurate description of the current and future impacts of increasing greenhouse gases, and two, mankind is not doing enough to mitigate the future warming,”

A frequent radio commentator on KPLU, 88.5 FM, Mass is noted for putting the science of weather in language and in a perspective that the general public can understand.

Over the years, Mass and his students have authored more than 70 scientific papers that document and explore West Coast weather phenomena, such as the Puget Sound convergence zone, coastal surges, and more.

Author of "The Weather of the Pacific Northwest," published in 2008, Mass has been involved in a number of weather-related initiatives, including acquisition of coast radar for the Washington coast and use of smartphone pressure observations for predicting the weather.

 

 

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