Community

Ribbon-cutting ceremony for 'Fluke' on Valentine's Day

Friday Harbor
Friday Harbor's first-ever piece of public art, entitled 'Fluke', at home atop a moss-covered outcropping at the corner of First and A streets.
— image credit: Steve Wehrly

What would Valentine's Day be without cards, candy, flowers and… a ribbon-cutting ceremony?

Now that's a new one.

The Town of Friday Harbor will celebrate and inaugurate its first-ever piece of public art Thursday, at noon, with a official ribbon-cutting ceremony for the aluminum sculpture that goes by the name of "Fluke".

Created by local artist Micajah Bienvenu, Fluke, a 4-foot tall, 12-foot wide polished aluminum representation of the tail of a whale, weighing 180 pounds, was installed atop the rocky outcropping that overlooks the ferry landing, on the corner of First and A streets, Jan. 10. Its purchase and installation by the town were made possible thanks to donations of 31 separate residents and businesses totaling $25,000.

Bienvenu, who received offers for Fluke from other Northwest communities, opted to sell the sculpture to the town at a discounted price to ensure it would stay in his hometown. Mayor Carrie Lacher believes that Fluke fits nicely in the town.

“I’m just thrilled by this gift of public art,” Lacher said in a press release announcing the ribbon-cutting event. “I never envisioned this stunning piece in its new location. But now I can't envision the rock without it. I know ‘Fluke’ is so special it will cause more community members to come forward with fresh and novel ideas of how to enhance our town.”

 

 

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Oct 1 edition online now. Browse the archives.